Moab Golf Course Petroglyphs: See The Moab Man And Tons Of Other Rock Art

There are affiliate links in here.  I get a small commission if you purchase through them at no extra cost to you.

A last-minute addition to my Moab rock art bucket list was the Moab Man at the Golf Course Rock Art Site.  I think I actually had the Moab Man on but Utah bucket list but didn’t realize it was so easy to see.  So one night before dinner, with a little spare time, we decided to head out and see the Moab Man and his beautiful earrings.

The site is super easy to get to and there are signs along the way.  You’ll be going through some residential areas, but its a pretty straight shot to get there.

DSCF9834

And you’ll definitely know when you’re there.  There is a parking area by Robertson’s Farm with a fence in front of the petroglyphs so you can’t go right up to them.  There is an impressive amount of them here, but the Moab Man and his earrings are the highlight.  The panels seen here are from the Anasazi and Freemont periods.  This is a great addition to any southern Utah road trip or Trail of the Ancients road trip.  It’s also a great filler between bigger activities.

DSCF9846

Where is the golf course rock art site in Moab?

How long do you need?

You could easily get to and see the golf course rock art site in an hour.  Maybe even a half hour.  It’s just a short drive from downtown Moab towards The Needles section of Canyonlands.

DSCF9840

What to bring camping in Moab

Tent – I love the REI Passage 2 tent for one or two people.  It’s small and fairly light.  If you need a four-person tent, I’d go with this one, the REI Half DomeYou can check out my tent here.

Sleeping pad – Gotta make the tent comfy!  The one I have isn’t available anymore but this one is similar.  It’s self-inflating and just needs a little help filling all the way.  Buy the sleeping pad here.

Sleeping Bag – I have the Nemo Viola 35 and love it because it’s not as restrictive as the mummy bags.  It has ventilation slits for those warmer nights.  Check out my sleeping bag here.

Puffy quilt – If you’re a really warm sleeper and visiting in the summer, a puffy quilt might be a better option.  I prefer this for hotter nights.  Check out the Rumpl camp quilts here.

Pillow – If you’re just driving, I’d just bring a regular pillow, but if you’re flying then renting a car, you might want a smaller pillow.  This is a good non-inflatible option.  Here is a good inflatable option.

Camp chairs – If you plan on doing a lot of camping outside of this trip, and backpacking especially, the REI Flexlite chairs are great choices.  Check out the camp chairs here.

Lantern – I love having a lantern for in the tent at night, reading in the dark, or going to the bathroom in the middle of the night.  The LuminAID is my favorite and you can charge your phone on it.  Buy the LuminAID lantern here.

Hiking poles – These will be helpful on longer hikes that are on the steeper side.  They’ll be good if you have bad knees for when you’re going downhill and will give you something to lean on going up the hills.

Snacks – These are more important for long hikes, but you never know when you’ll get hungry!  I like EPIC bars (kind of like beef jerky but different), Sahale nut mix things, and Moon Cheese.  There’s always the good old Clif Bars and trail mix, too.

Water bottle – It’ll be hot and humid and you’ll need to stay hydrated.  A Hydro Flask will keep your water ice cold all day long.

Sunscreen – If you plan on being outside, you’ll want sunscreen.  I like the Neutrogena a lot, but if you’ll be visiting a beach soon, you’ll want a reef-safe sunscreen.

Hat – You’ll want some kind of hat to keep the sun out of your eyes.  A baseball hat should be fine but a bucket hat or sun hat could help keep the sun off your neck.

Sunglasses – This is a must, especially with the strong desert sun.  Sunglasses are best paired with a hat on those really bright days.

Light Jacket – Because you just never know.  Weather can change quickly depending on where you are and if you’ll be in any slot canyons, they can get cool depending on the time of day and season.  I usually use my rain jacket for this.

Headlamp – I tend to carry my headlamp around all the time when we’re hiking.  This isn’t the exact one I have, but it’s similar and if I needed to replace mine, I’d probably get this one.

DSCF9848

Things to keep in mind when visiting ruins:

  • Do not touch the rock art (pictographs or petroglyphs) because the oils on our fingers can degrade them.
  • If you find artifacts, do not take them.  Leave them where they are and just take pictures.
  • If there are structures (rooms, kivas, anything like that) don’t enter them unless it is stated that you can.  Most places you can’t but national and state parks will have restored structures you can enter.  Mesa Verde, Edge of the Cedars, and Anasazi Museum all have ruins you can enter.
  • And finally, don’t carve in or write on the rocks!  I don’t want to have to say this, but I need to fo sho.

Have you seen the Moab Man?  What are your favorite petroglyphs in Moab?  

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.